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introduction
Source : InterfaithFamily

A beautiful ceremony marks the end of Shabbat on Saturday evening. This ending ritual is called Havdalah, which means separation or distinction in Hebrew. The Torah teaches that God created the world by making distinctions, first between light anddarkness, next between water and empty space, then between earth and water. The final distinction made in that week of creation was between regular time and holy time. Just as candles, wine and challah begin Shabbat, a braided candle, wine and spices mark the end of Shabbat. We use all five of our senses ina short ritual. Even if you haven’t spent the day celebrating Shabbat, Havdalah is a lovely time to gather family and friends together before you move into the week of errands, chores and work. The Havdalah ceremony consists of blessings over wine, fragrant spices, the braided candle and, lastly, acknowledging distinctions. There are also two simple songs that conclude the ceremony.

The Four Blessings: Background

Shabbat officially ends when you can see three stars in the night sky. Inorder to watch the light fade from the sky, turn off your lights. You may wish to hold your Havdalah ritual by the fading light shining through your windows.You will need a braided candle, a full cup of wine and a container of fragrant spices.

Why a braided candle? The blessing refers to “lights of fire.” The braided candle gives us several wicks to represent those lights. Braided candles can be purchased at Jewish bookstores where you will find many variations, from two candles twisted together to multiple, multicolored braids. In a pinch, you can hold two Shabbat candles together or even two matches. Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin interprets the braiding of the candles saying,

"We tend to enter Shabbat with our souls unraveling, pulled as we are in so many directions by the demands of the week and the many roles we play. On Shabbat, we have time to weave together those disparate strands of our lives. We may begin the day like the Shabbat candles, apart, pieces of ourselves separated from one another. But through the peace of Shabbat,we emerge whole once again, woven together like the wicks of the Havdalah candle.

[From The Tapestry of Jewish Time: A Spiritual Guide to Holidays andLife-Cycle Events, Behrman House, 2000, page 44.]

Why A Full Cup Of Wine?

Wine is a symbol of the sweetness of Shabbat. The full glass of wine that we use symbolizes our wish for the blessings of Shabbat to overflow into the coming week.

Why Spices?

We are thought to have a second soul on Shabbat that leaves us when Shabbat ends. The sweet smell of the spices reduces our sadness at the departure of Shabbat. There is only one rule about the fragrant spices: that there should be more than one. You may use cloves and cinnamon from your baking cupboard or any other sweet smelling herbs, flowers or fragrant fruit.

It is easy to make your own spice container or use any open dish or container. If you insert whole cloves into an orange, you will have a “spice box.” You may also purchase elegant silver or pottery versions tohold your spices.

introduction
Source : ritualwell.org

This Chanukah, we rededicate ourselves to the fight to end police violence and racial profiling.

As we light the Chanukah candles, we remember those who have lost their lives to racist police violence. We remember the lives they lived and the loved ones they left behind, and we dedicate the Chanukah flame to their memory.

As we light the Chanukah candles, we remind ourselves that police violence can and must stop. Each night we take one action to move us closer to the world we long for, free of racism, violence and injustice. 

This ritual toolkit provides opportunities to join the movement in different ways. Each night we have an option to take different kinds of action in the fight for Black lives, for racial justice, and to continue the call for accountability and justice for all victims of police brutality and violence. This ritual toolkit offers two paths to action: Option 1, a social media action, or Option 2, an activity directed toward the demands of Ferguson Action. We recognize that a successful movement needs many different kinds of contributions. May all of our contributions, whether in our homes or on the streets, bring about a society where Black lives matter.

The idea for this document sprang out of an ad-hoc national coalition of Jewish racial justice organizers. For more information, visit Chanukahaction.org.

Wine
Source : InterfaithFamily

Light the braided Havdalah candle, but don’t say a blessing yet.Thefirst blessing that we say is over the wine. Lift the cup of wine and say:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּֽפֶן

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha'olam, boray pri hagafen.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.
[A traditional translation.]

-

Holy One of Blessing,Your Presence fills creation,forming the fruit of the vine.

[An alternative translationfrom Vetaher Libenu, a prayerbook created byCongregation Beth El of the Sudbury River Valley.]

Spices
Source : InterfaithFamily

The second blessing is over the spices. Lift the spices and say:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא מִינֵי בְשָׂמִים

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha'olam, boray minay vesamim.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, ruler of the universe,who creates species of fragrance.

[A traditional translation.]

After saying the blessing, inhale the sweet smell. Pass around the spicebox so that everybody can inhale the scent deeply.

Fire
Source : InterfaithFamily

The third blessing is over the lights of the candle, which we havealready lit. We say:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא מְאוֹרֵי הָאֵשׁ

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha'olam, boray me'oray ha'aysh.

-

Blessed are You, Lord our God, ruler of the universe, whocreates the lights of fire.

[A traditional translation.]

-

Blessed are you, THE RADIANCE,our God, the sovereign of all worlds,who creates the light of fire.

[An alternative translation from KolHaneshamah, the Reconstructionist siddur.]

-

After the blessing, hold up your hands tofeel the warmth of the braided candle. Tomake use of the light, some people look forthe reflection of the candle light in theirfingernails. Another custom has people startwith fingers cupped toward their palms andslowly opening them to see the light ontheir palms.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : InterfaithFamily

The last blessing marks the separation of Shabbat from the rest of the week. We say:

,בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹֽדֶשׁ לְחוֹל, בֵּין אוֹר לְחֹֽשֶׁךְ
.בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵֽׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה
.בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹֽדֶשׁ לְחוֹל

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha'olam, hamavdil bayn kodesh lechol bayn or lechoshech
bayn Yisrael la'amim bayn yom hashevi'i leshayshet yemay hama'aseh.
Baruch atah, Adonai, hamavdil bayn kodesh lechol.

-

Blessed are You, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who separates
between holy and secular, between light and darkness, between Israel
and other peoples, between the seventh day and the six days of work.
Blessed are You, Lord our God, who separates between holy and secular.

[A traditional translation.]

-

Blessed are you, The Many-Named, our God, the sovereign of all worlds,
who separates between holy and ordinary, light and dark,
the seventh day and the six days of work.
Blessed are you, The Invisible who separates the holy from the ordinary.

[An alternative translation from Kol Haneshamah, the Reconstructionist siddur.]

We then sip the wine and extinguish the candle in the remaining wine. Many have the custom of singing “Eliyahu Ha’Navi” while slowly lowering the Havdalah candle into the wine so that the candle is extinguished as the song ends.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Eigth Night: Rededication

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 8th night of Chanukah, we remember Eric Garner. May Eric’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the sixth of six demands called for by Ferguson Action organizers.

As Chanukah draws to a close, let us rededicate ourselves to working for racial justice in the coming months and years by making a specific commitment. Spend some time looking into organizations in your community working on issues of racial justice, such as police accountability, racial profiling, and the prison industrial complex, to name a few. What organizations, particularly those led by people of color, are doing this work? What issues are they addressing? How can you support their work? What work can be done in your Jewish community to invite frank conversations—and plans for action— about racism in the Jewish community? Write down two or three ways you commit to take action in the coming months and beyond.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Seventh Night: Fuel the Fire

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 7th night of Chanukah, we remember Dante Parker. May Dante’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the fifth of six demands called for by Ferguson Action organizers:

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Sixth Night: In our Times

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 6th night of Chanukah, we remember Tarika Wilson. May Tarika’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the fourth of six demands called for by Ferguson Action organizers.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Fifth Night: Give Gelt

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 5th night of Chanukah, we remember Tamir Rice. May Tamir’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the third of six demands called for by Ferguson Action organizers.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Fourth Night: Kindling Hope

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 4th night of Chanukah, we remember Rekia Boyd. May Rekia’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the second of six demands called for by Ferguson Action organizers:

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Third Night: Not by Might

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 3rd night of Chanukah, we dedicate this flame to the memory of Aiyana Mo’Nay Stanley Jones. May Aiyana’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice!

Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the first of six demands called for by Ferguson Action organizers.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

Second Night: Generate Light

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 2nd night of Chanukah, we remember Yvette Smith. May Yvette’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you

shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the vision called for by Ferguson Action organizers.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org

On the first night, we say:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵנוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם שֶהֶחֱינָוּ וקְִיּמְָנוּ והְִגִּיעָנוּ לַזּמְַן הַזּהֶ

Baruch A-tah Ado-nai, E -lo-he-nu Me-lech Ha-olam,she-he-hiyanu ve-kiyy’manu ve-hig-gi-anu lazman ha-zeh.

Blessed are You, Source of All Light, who grants us life, who sustains us, and who brings us to this very moment.

First Night: Public Observance

Read aloud: As we light this candle on the 1st night of Chanukah, we remember Michael Brown. May Michael’s memory be for a blessing.

(Recite Chanukah blessings)

Read aloud: With this dedication we are moved by our Jewish values that teach us, “Justice! Justice you shall pursue!” and tonight we take action to carry out the vision called for by Ferguson Action organizers.

Havdalah Blessing
Source : ritualwell.org
CHANUKAH BLESSINGS

Each night, candles are placed in themenorah, also called the chanukiah (a nine-branched candelabra), from right to left. The shamash (taller helper) candle is lit first each night. Then the blessings are recited, after which the shamash is used to light the other candles, moving from left to right so that the newest candles is lit first each night. According to theTalmud, the chanukiah is placed in front of the house or a window for all to see, unless such exposure might

be endangering (Babylonian TalmudShabbat21b).

Kavannah/Intention before lighting candles:

נר אלהים נשמת אדם The light of God is the human soul. —Proverbs 20:27

Read aloud: As we light each candle, we remember the souls whose light has been extinguished too soon because of police violence. As we create more and more light each night of Chanukah, we commit ourselves to working for police accountability and an end to the systemic racism that has led to the death of too many divine lights.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵנוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם אֲׁשֶר קִדְּׁשָנוּ בְּמִצְווֹתָיו וצְִוּנָו

לְהַדְלִיק נרֵ שֶל חֲנכָֻּה

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai, E-lo-he-nu Me-lech ha-olam, a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-tav, ve-tzi-va-nu le-had-liknerCha-nu-kah.

Blessed are You, Source of All Light, who makes us holy through your mitzvot, and who instructs us to kindle the Chanukah light.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵנוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם שֶעָשָׂה נסִִּים לַאֲבוֹתֵינוּ בַּיּמִָים הַהֵם בַּזּמְַן הַזּהֶ

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai, E-lo-he-nu Me-lech Ha-olam,

she-a-sa ni-sim la-avo-te-nu ba-ya-mim ha-hem ba-zman ha-zeh.

Blessed are You, Soure of All Light, who performed miracles for our ancestors in their days at this time.

Songs
Source : InterfaithFamily

El-i-ya-hu ha’Na-vi
El-i-ya-hu ha’Tish-bi
El-i-ya-hu ha-Gi-la-di
bim’hey-ra, v'ya-mey-nu,
ya-vo El-ey-nu
im Mash-i-ach ben Dav-id

The song is translated as,
“Elijah the Prophet, Elijah of Tishbe in Gilead, come to us speedily,in our days, with the Messiah, son of David.”

Songs
Source : Moishe House & G-dcast

Come learn the Havdalah blessings with Moishe House and Elana Jagoda! With a little help from our karaoke style video, you can practice blessing the wine, spices, fire and ending of Shabbat. Get familiar with the ceremony on your own, then try it out at Moishe House or *your* house.

Songs
Source : ritualwell.org

Sung to the tune of Dayeinu:

All we have right now is now
This one moment
Here and now
It is all there truly is
Boy & how!

It's enough (3X)
To live in the present time & space
It's enough (3X)
To be fully present

Living in the yet to be

Is not being truly free

Freedom's living consciously

Girl & how!

It's enough (3X)

To live in the present time & space

It's enough (3X)

To be fully present

Living in the that was then

Is not living truly is zen

Mindfulness is the way, amen!

Gosh & how!

It's enough (3X)

To live in the present time & space

It's enough (3X)

To be fully present